ALONE ONE's blog – AloneOne.com


CASH / COZ Tribute TONIGHT

Boston lost a legend last week. CASH/COZ, a big inspiration to me and my generation in  Boston graffiti late 80’s/ early 90’s.

If you’re in Boston tonight…

cash-tribute-560x560

coz-cashCASH/ COZ in action. Dudley Station Boston, 1986 (*flick stolen from internet).



TenderTrap/ Frontal Labotomy display

A few pics from the TenderTrap/ Frontal Labotomy display…

AloneOne-2016-TenderTrapVitrine
AloneOne-2016-TenderTrapVitrine(b)
AloneOne-2016-TenderTrapVitrine(a)
AloneOne-2016-TenderTrapVitrine(c).jpg

On display until TOMORROW, August 2nd.
Go check it out at TenderTrap, 66 Greenpoint Ave, Brooklyn NYC. Open 4pm- late.



CAYPE in the Boston Globe

My homie CAYPE in an article from THE BOSTON GLOBE, May 31, 2013 (reprinted from here and here):

“GRAFFITI ARTIST FIGHTS HIS ADDICTION TO STREET ART”
by Aaron Dentel-Post  GLOBE CORRESPONDENT     MAY 31, 2013

Image
Former graffiti artist Tyson Andree has fine arts works in a group exhibition in Adelson Galleries Boston through June 30.

Graffiti gained popularity as art on New York City subway trains in the 1970s. Andree says he’s been told that it was artists named Gene, short for Genius, and Sen2 who brought it to Boston around 1980. He says his history of the Boston graffiti scene comes from an artist named Click, one of the originators of Boston’s graffiti scene.

By 1983, Boston had a full-blown graffiti culture. The elevated Orange Line route that ran through Roxbury was a particular hot spot, with graffiti works lining roofs and high walls within view of passing trains.

More than two decades later, balanced on a girder over the iron-gray water of the Charles River, Andree, now 33, is going by the name Caype, and he must be one of the most prolific and longest active graffiti writers in Boston’s history. It’s also a chapter in his life he’s trying to move past.

He is the first graffiti artist to be represented by the Adelson Galleries Boston, which deals primarily in artwork by contemporary and modern masters like Jim Dine, Andrew Wyeth, Alex Katz, and others. Andree is included in a group show titled “Ten Artists,” which runs through June 30.

Some of his works on paper have also been included in Barry McGee’s exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art.

Continue reading



“Flip The Script” Book Release Party & Art Show… NYC, Tonight

I got a piece in…

FlipTheScript_flyer
Flip The Script” Book Release + Art Show
at…

REED SPACE
151 Orchard St
(Lower East Side) NYC

Thursday, April 4th. 7-10PM.

UPDATE: Some follow up photos from the night HERE.



NEKST MSK D-30 R.I.P.

The graffiiti world lost another one yesterday with the early passing of Houston  CA  NYC, nationwide crusher “NEKST”…

ImageNEKST – Spring and Bowery (NYC)

Image
“MSK” by NEKST, seen from the Williamsburg Bridge

kgibbs-61391“NEKST” Houston St. (NYC)*

Image
“NEKST” Houston St. (NYC)**

Nekst-truck“NEKST” (S.F.) **

Image“NEKST” (the Bronx, NYC) **

Image
“NEKST” MBTA Red Line (Boston) **

* stolen pic from theKeeganGibbs.com

** stolen pic from ?

 



“Woods. Grain”
November 28, 2012, 6:25 am
Filed under: Art | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Painted a car a few weeks ago for my homie. It was a mid 90’s  Oldsmobile OD MOBILE station wagon, but we decided to give it a kind of  “retro” look with some faux wood panelling…



Towards the back I changed up to some woods/trees as a sort of homage to his old whip.




Continue reading



SubCulture #1: Can It
August 22, 2012, 9:00 am
Filed under: Books, Graffiti | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Appears I got a little shine on the cover of the new zine “SubCulture #1: Can It”. Good looks.

From their site:

SubCulture #1: Can It

Introducing SubCulture, a new zine about art and culture in the subway. The first issue, entitled “Can It,” is all about the old style trash cans in the subway. These cans acted as a canvas for graffiti writers up until they were discontinued in 2011.

The handmade zine includes 32 pages (including the color cover) of images and text on the topic. Each one comes with the following: one numbered copy of SubCulture #1: Can It, an unique envelope that mimics the design of the subway trash cans complete with a mini CAN IT FOR A GREENER PLANET sticker and handmade mini stickers by over 15 different artists, a Subway Art Blog business card and vinyl sticker, and at least one other assorted sticker.

The zine is limited to an edition of 100. SubCulture is now available at the Subway Art Blog store at: subwayart.bigcartel.com



“HELLO KITTY” Bathroom Mural
August 15, 2012, 8:28 am
Filed under: Art | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

A Hello Kitty/ New York City inspired bathroom mural I did last year…

Image(click images, then click again to enlarge)

Image

Image

acrylic, spraypaint, enamal and glitter make-up on bathroom wall
12′ x 4′ (approx.)
2011



Kevin CYR “In Praise of Rust”

Cool oil painting by Kevin Cyr. A NYC van, complete with rust, dents, and graffiti. And upon close examination… ALONE and NET marker tags (under a paint tag) on the door. Haha.. New York City!

Image

“In Praise Of Rust” by Kevin Cyr


(detail)

Here’s a few more of his paintings…


Image
Image
Image

from JonathanLevineGallery.com

NEW YORK, NY (April 3, 2012) — Jonathan LeVine Gallery is pleased to announce In Praise of Rust, a series of new oil paintings on panel by New York-based artist Kevin Cyr, in what will be his first solo exhibition at the gallery.

In Praise of Rust 
features paintings of old vehicles seen on the streets of New York—primarily vans and commercial delivery trucks—covered in graffiti, rust, scratches, scuffs, dents and other marks of distinction. Cyr includes a meticulous level of detail in his portrait-like representations with devoted attention to every imperfection and sign of age. Removing the context of the urban landscape, he places a strong focus on his subjects by isolating them in fields of flat, solid color.

The neglected appearance and utilitarian function of these vans carry a bit of nostalgia. Once ubiquitous in large urban cities, they have now become far more rare, replaced by heavily branded box trucks. In the artist’s words, “painting them is my way of documenting a grit that is slowly disappearing from New York. In a culture where people are lured by the appeal of status-enhancing symbols, I find so much character in derelict vans. I have always been interested in painting vehicles that have defined the evolution of the American landscape.”

On the subject of his exhibition title, Cyr says “Rust serves as a good metaphor for this series, a symbol for deterioration and decay. The meaning also changes slightly when used as an adjective, as in: to become ‘rusty’ or impaired through inaction or disuse.”

Common themes in Cyr’s larger body of work have included mobility, sustainability and self-reliance. Referencing consumer culture and the fuel/energy crisis, these paintings offer a subtle commentary on how rapidly the technology of our generation becomes perceived as obsolete, amid an increasingly unstable and uncertain climate of economic and environmental issues.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Kevin Cyr was born in 1976 in Edmundston, New Brunswick, Canada. He grew up in Madawaska, Maine and received a BFA from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. Cyr is currently based in Brooklyn, New York. His paintings, drawings, sculptures and installations have been exhibited by galleries and museums, internationally. In March 2012, Cyr’s work was the subject of an article in The New York Times. Cyr was recently interviewed by fellow artist Dan Witz for a feature that will appear in the May 2012 issue of Juxtapoz, and the May 2012 issue of NYLON Magazine will include a story on Cyr, as well.



“STUCK” Zine #1

New zine out from CarnageNYC. Thick 60 pages of pics and interviews, stickers, and dope  silkscreened covers (frameable pieces themselves). Check em out…

“Stuck” No 1 consists of 60 pages of previously unreleased photos of some of the sickest NYC stickers plus interviews with BASER, ALONE, MINUS and CRASTY. Each copy of the zine comes with three hand-written stickers, along with a full set of four vinyl stickers made exclusively for this issue. The cover image was screenprinted over layers of stickers and up to four colors of paint, giving each cover a completely unique look and texture. (Note: a very small number of covers are available in white ink).

Stuck is limited to 300 hand-numbered copies.

More info and pics at CarnageNYC.

Get a copy here.

Image
Image
( * pics stolen from Juxtapoz, words snagged from Carnage.)


“Bobby Zero”

A background I painted for a cocktail party & presentation for the Flying Canter Brothers’ new film “Bobby Zero” starring Mos Def and Erykah Badu…

35′ x 6′
spraypaint on… not a wall… not canvas… but… PAPER! Ugh!!
(photo:  Rae Maxwell ..Thanks!)

The Flying Canter Brothers talking a bit about the film.

DJ Lo Down Loretta Brown, or as you might know her.. Erykah Badu, provided some audio candy for the night.. fun times.

Filming for “Bobby Zero” will begin shortly, check it out when it’s done next year!



NYC/ Brooklyn Gang Graffiti
January 14, 2012, 12:00 pm
Filed under: Graffiti, Photography | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

After aborting my Los Angeles relocation a few years ago, I thought along with the gang driven drive-by shootings and talk of “colors”, I’d also be leaving the accompanying  graffiti. Well, maybe not so quick. Seems that New York has been getting its fair share of gang turf wars as evident on the streets of Brooklyn…





As Spotted in…

A car I painted back in ’06/’07 spotted in a photo in the Boston Globe (some story about The Big Dig) recently…

Here’s a better pic of the car…



“Becoming A Writer” by Harlan Ellison
November 11, 2011, 11:11 am
Filed under: Inspiration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

“Becoming a writer is easy. Staying a writer is hard” – Harlan Ellison

..funny how a lot of these quotes by different writers about writer’s can easily be read into by other writers.



X-MEN Boston, late 1980’s – early 1990’s
November 9, 2011, 2:41 pm
Filed under: Graffiti, Inspiration | Tags: , , , , ,

OK, first off I have to say this is barely an original post, all the pics are stolen off the internet along with the Dash history lesson, but the influence that Boston X-MEN had on my graffiti beginnings can’t be stated enough. Early to mid eighties, Boston’s elevated MBTA orange line was the center of graffiti. Looking out the windows at the cityscapes and the beautiful rooftop murals and signatures made a huge impression on me. When the el was taken down in 1989 focus turned to the streets. And from Egleston Square to Forest Hills up to Roslindale Square… it was all X-MEN…

a classic “X-MEN” blockbuster by MK. Not sure where this one was. There was one of these on a fire escape facing Egleston Sq in 89-90. It was a landmark spot. A very official “Welcome to Egleston: this is X-MEN territory!”

“SCENE” wasn’t X-MEN, but the “DASH” under SCENE’s “S” was. And this photo really brings back memories. After the orange line moved from it’s elevated Washington Street location to it’s present trench location, Amory and Lamartine streets became the new Washington Street in a way. This building was on Lamartine between Paul Gore and Wyman Streets. I would pass this on the regular going to see my first girlfriend on Sheridan St, so of course this time was quite impressionable. When this building was removed in the early 90’s for some new condos (a sign of times to come), it really was a nail in the coffin for an amazing era in Boston graffiti and my youth.


“MK” and “RICH3” at the top of the bleachers at English High School, home to many a  writer’s meatings.  Probably 1990. Well visible from Washington Street and Williams Street when cutting over to Amory Street. Great Spot.
great hand styles by WISDOM (X-MEN TUF).

“ARCH”  between Jackson Square and Roxbury Crossing, probably 1990.
.
“RICH” throw-up.

“MKAY” (MK) at Jamaica Plain High School, before it changed to English High School in 1989. Another classic location.
.
Unfortunately I can’t find the 2 MOST influential X-MEN pieces to me (Anyone has them, PLEASE send em over! (That means you BYG!)). The first was the “X-MEN” in all blues at the Forest Hills wall, 1989/1990, done by MK (and probably others, Romeo? Rich?). The second was the “ROMEO RICH” at the same wall, same time, bubble letters with a fresh yellow/green fill and (I believe) red outline and these RIDICULOUS shines. Oooh! The first time I went up to that wall in person I knew if I wanted to do graffiti, especially in Jamaica Plain, I better make that shit dope. X-MEN had seriously set some high standards.

Here’s a quick history lesson taken from BostonGraffitiGhosts.com

Continue reading



%d bloggers like this: