ALONE ONE's blog – AloneOne.com


TenderTrap/ Frontal Labotomy display

A few pics from the TenderTrap/ Frontal Labotomy display…

AloneOne-2016-TenderTrapVitrine
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AloneOne-2016-TenderTrapVitrine(a)
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On display until TOMORROW, August 2nd.
Go check it out at TenderTrap, 66 Greenpoint Ave, Brooklyn NYC. Open 4pm- late.



20 years ago… Digable Planets – “Pacifics”

“NY is a museum with its posters and graffiti 
If you’re in the city
on Sunday 
come check me”…

– “Pacifics” from Digable Planets

20 years after being released, this song is still one of my favorite hip-hop tracks to just straight up CHILLLLL out to.



Just a few tunes for the winter…

Slow blogging season. More soon. For now, a few classic tunes..



More Art Soon/ “Letter To Ex”
October 10, 2012, 5:50 am
Filed under: Art, Inspiration, Ramblings | Tags: , , , , ,

“Letter To Ex”
pen on paper
2012



Danny Brown “Grown Up”
August 3, 2012, 9:00 am
Filed under: Inspiration, Music | Tags: , , ,

Slow bloggin this summer, new stuff soon. Until then, my fave video for 2012, Danny Brown’s “Grown Up”…

*thanks to Mark for always showing me the newest ish.



Kevin CYR “In Praise of Rust”

Cool oil painting by Kevin Cyr. A NYC van, complete with rust, dents, and graffiti. And upon close examination… ALONE and NET marker tags (under a paint tag) on the door. Haha.. New York City!

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“In Praise Of Rust” by Kevin Cyr


(detail)

Here’s a few more of his paintings…


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from JonathanLevineGallery.com

NEW YORK, NY (April 3, 2012) — Jonathan LeVine Gallery is pleased to announce In Praise of Rust, a series of new oil paintings on panel by New York-based artist Kevin Cyr, in what will be his first solo exhibition at the gallery.

In Praise of Rust 
features paintings of old vehicles seen on the streets of New York—primarily vans and commercial delivery trucks—covered in graffiti, rust, scratches, scuffs, dents and other marks of distinction. Cyr includes a meticulous level of detail in his portrait-like representations with devoted attention to every imperfection and sign of age. Removing the context of the urban landscape, he places a strong focus on his subjects by isolating them in fields of flat, solid color.

The neglected appearance and utilitarian function of these vans carry a bit of nostalgia. Once ubiquitous in large urban cities, they have now become far more rare, replaced by heavily branded box trucks. In the artist’s words, “painting them is my way of documenting a grit that is slowly disappearing from New York. In a culture where people are lured by the appeal of status-enhancing symbols, I find so much character in derelict vans. I have always been interested in painting vehicles that have defined the evolution of the American landscape.”

On the subject of his exhibition title, Cyr says “Rust serves as a good metaphor for this series, a symbol for deterioration and decay. The meaning also changes slightly when used as an adjective, as in: to become ‘rusty’ or impaired through inaction or disuse.”

Common themes in Cyr’s larger body of work have included mobility, sustainability and self-reliance. Referencing consumer culture and the fuel/energy crisis, these paintings offer a subtle commentary on how rapidly the technology of our generation becomes perceived as obsolete, amid an increasingly unstable and uncertain climate of economic and environmental issues.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Kevin Cyr was born in 1976 in Edmundston, New Brunswick, Canada. He grew up in Madawaska, Maine and received a BFA from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. Cyr is currently based in Brooklyn, New York. His paintings, drawings, sculptures and installations have been exhibited by galleries and museums, internationally. In March 2012, Cyr’s work was the subject of an article in The New York Times. Cyr was recently interviewed by fellow artist Dan Witz for a feature that will appear in the May 2012 issue of Juxtapoz, and the May 2012 issue of NYLON Magazine will include a story on Cyr, as well.



DEPOE!
May 13, 2012, 6:53 am
Filed under: Art Show, Inspiration, Photography | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Oldie but goodie flick I took of my homie Depoe One in action on a mural 20 feet up…

Depoe… on a ladder, on scaffolding, on cynder blocks, on a picnic table. Brooklyn, 2009 FTW!

And speaking of Depoe, if you’re in NYC today check out my homie Depoe’s show  opening today…

Crossing Art
136-17 39th Avenue (Btwn. Main St & 138th St)
Ground Floor
Flushing, NY 11354 
www.crossingart.com



X-MEN Boston, late 1980’s – early 1990’s
November 9, 2011, 2:41 pm
Filed under: Graffiti, Inspiration | Tags: , , , , ,

OK, first off I have to say this is barely an original post, all the pics are stolen off the internet along with the Dash history lesson, but the influence that Boston X-MEN had on my graffiti beginnings can’t be stated enough. Early to mid eighties, Boston’s elevated MBTA orange line was the center of graffiti. Looking out the windows at the cityscapes and the beautiful rooftop murals and signatures made a huge impression on me. When the el was taken down in 1989 focus turned to the streets. And from Egleston Square to Forest Hills up to Roslindale Square… it was all X-MEN…

a classic “X-MEN” blockbuster by MK. Not sure where this one was. There was one of these on a fire escape facing Egleston Sq in 89-90. It was a landmark spot. A very official “Welcome to Egleston: this is X-MEN territory!”

“SCENE” wasn’t X-MEN, but the “DASH” under SCENE’s “S” was. And this photo really brings back memories. After the orange line moved from it’s elevated Washington Street location to it’s present trench location, Amory and Lamartine streets became the new Washington Street in a way. This building was on Lamartine between Paul Gore and Wyman Streets. I would pass this on the regular going to see my first girlfriend on Sheridan St, so of course this time was quite impressionable. When this building was removed in the early 90’s for some new condos (a sign of times to come), it really was a nail in the coffin for an amazing era in Boston graffiti and my youth.


“MK” and “RICH3” at the top of the bleachers at English High School, home to many a  writer’s meatings.  Probably 1990. Well visible from Washington Street and Williams Street when cutting over to Amory Street. Great Spot.
great hand styles by WISDOM (X-MEN TUF).

“ARCH”  between Jackson Square and Roxbury Crossing, probably 1990.
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“RICH” throw-up.

“MKAY” (MK) at Jamaica Plain High School, before it changed to English High School in 1989. Another classic location.
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Unfortunately I can’t find the 2 MOST influential X-MEN pieces to me (Anyone has them, PLEASE send em over! (That means you BYG!)). The first was the “X-MEN” in all blues at the Forest Hills wall, 1989/1990, done by MK (and probably others, Romeo? Rich?). The second was the “ROMEO RICH” at the same wall, same time, bubble letters with a fresh yellow/green fill and (I believe) red outline and these RIDICULOUS shines. Oooh! The first time I went up to that wall in person I knew if I wanted to do graffiti, especially in Jamaica Plain, I better make that shit dope. X-MEN had seriously set some high standards.

Here’s a quick history lesson taken from BostonGraffitiGhosts.com

Continue reading


R.I.P. Gill Scott-Heron
May 28, 2011, 11:30 am
Filed under: Inspiration, Music | Tags: , , , , , ,

Revolutionary poet, author, musician, spoken word pioneer, activist, all around legend and amazing inspiration to me,  Gil Scott-Heron, best known for his 1970 work “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”, died May 27th at a New York City hospital at 62 years old.

Best known for…
Continue reading



Workspace
July 1, 2010, 9:03 am
Filed under: Art, Inspiration, Photography | Tags: , , , , , , , ,















“..emotions moved to tears..”
January 12, 2010, 10:02 am
Filed under: Inspiration | Tags: , ,

“To me, there are three things we all should do every day. We should do this every day of our lives. Number one is laugh. You should laugh every day. Number two is think. You should spend some time in thought. And number three is, you should have your emotions moved to tears, could be happiness or joy. But think about it. If you laugh, you think, and you cry, that’s a full day. That’s a heck of a day. You do that seven days a week, you’re going to have something special.”

– Jim Valvano



Devin Lomon-Humes/ “The Healing Arts”

In 1998 my friend Devin had an “accident”.

…..whoa. ..Just writing an intro to this is harder than I would have ever imagined.

Devin. ……Devin’s a Boston based artist. ..shares a similar art background as me (y’all in the Boston graf circles might know him by another name) ..sometimes feels like family (we run in the same crew, SMS, represent!) .. we even share an odd “brotherhood” (we got the same birthday!). After the accident, I realized that he also shared some of my negative traits, like depression.

He then made a comeback that has inspired me more than I can ever explain. Just read the story. And big, big, big ups to Devin.

From the front page of the Boston Globe yesterday..

The Healing Arts
by Patricia Wen
Globe Staff/ April 12, 2009

“A suicide attempt left a son’s body broken, and his mother lost to guilt. With brush and bow, they have learned again to hope.

Devin

Every chance he gets, Devin Lomon-Humes paints. With all the energy his ravaged body can muster, he drags a brush across a canvas, using bold colors to make radiant forms that defy the darkness he knows so well.

Glynis Lomon, his mother, plays the cello. Pulling her bow in rapid-fire strokes, she creates urgent jazz rhythms that fill every nook of her Wellesley apartment, and help her say things she otherwise buries.

Their creations are also their escape. They talk little of the winter afternoon more than a decade ago when Devin decided to die and nearly succeeded, a day when Glynis left him alone for about an hour and almost lost him. Guilt consumes her.

Filling the quiet space between them is their art, which has become their balm and, as it turns out, their bond. This is the story of a young man and his mother, of a brush and a bow, and a long, unusual journey toward hope.

It was the winter of 1998, and Devin, 21, was a talented student at the Massachusetts College of Art, with roguish good looks that were winning him modeling contracts. But he was also tortured by depression and paranoid delusions. Glynis was a struggling single mother, working as a massage therapist to supplement her nominal income as a musician.

Friends found it hard to tell whether Devin’s behavior came from being part of a bohemian family – or was a sign of mental illness. Some madness may have been an inheritance: His father was the late Harold “Doc” Humes, a novelist and cofounder of the Paris Review whose gregarious life included at least one stint in a psychiatric ward.

When he was in Boston in the late 1970s, Humes was Glynis’s much-older, on-and-off boyfriend and father of Devin – though in name only. He was too caught up in his role as a kind of eccentric genius around Harvard Square, fascinating college students with his iconoclastic ideas, including the therapeutic effects of marijuana and massage, to focus too much on the child.

Devin began to show signs of instability in adolescence, and shortly after turning 21, his mind began spiraling into a perilous place. At a Dec. 28 session with his therapist, Devin barely spoke, and the next day, he was equally uncommunicative with his psychiatrist. But with the few words he did offer, Devin made it clear to both clinicians that he was having suicidal thoughts. Glynis says she heard her son explicitly tell his psychiatrist that he wanted to throw himself in front of a subway train.”

… read the rest of the article here.

Devin Lomon-Humes painting1Devin’s first painting done with the brush in his mouth technique

Devin Lomon-Humes - musician drawingfrom his musican series

Devin!

(photos: Boston Globe/Suzanne Kreiter.  more here.)



“Devin”
January 4, 2009, 10:54 am
Filed under: Art, Graffiti | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Alone1 - "Devin"“Devin”
pen on NY Lotto ticket
3.25″ x 8.5″
12 – 2008

For  a really awesome kid, Devin. Changed my life more than he’ll ever know.



Be Brave
November 22, 2008, 4:48 pm
Filed under: Inspiration, YouTube | Tags: , , ,

I’m no big fan of of Pfiser, drug corporations, or many commercials, but this is exceptional..



Big A, Little A
November 19, 2008, 12:15 pm
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , , , , , ,

(If you don’t like punk or the lyrics are too much to read, just read the last verse.. words of wisdom.)

“Big A Little A” by Crass
recorded in 1980.

Big A, little A, bouncing B
The system might have got you but it won’t get me

1 – 2 – 3 – 4

External control are you gonna let them get you?
Do you wanna be a prisoner in the boundaries they set you?
You say you want to ba yourself, by christ do you think they’ll let you?
They’re out to get you get you get you get you get you get you GET YOU

Hello, hello, hello, this is the Lord God, can you hear?
Hellfire and damnation’s what I’ve got for you down there
On earth I have ambassadors, archbishop, vicar, pope
We’ll blind you with morality, you’d best abandon any hope,
We’re telling you you’d better pray cos you were born in sin
Right from the start we’ll build a cell and then we’ll lock you in
We sit in holy judgement condemning those that stray
We offer our forgiveness, but first we’ll make you pay

External control are you gonna let them get you?
Do you wanna be a prisoner in the boundaries they set you?
You say you want to be yourself, by christ do you think they’ll let you?
They’re out to get you get you get you get you get you get you get you

Hello, hello, hello, now here’s a massage from your queen
As figurehead of the status quo I set the social scene
I’m most concerned about my people, I want to give them peace
So I’m making sure they stay in line with my army and police
My prisons and my mental homes have ever open doors
For those amongst my subjects who dare to ask for more
Unruliness and disrespect are things I can’t allow
So I’ll see the peasants grovel if they refuse to bow

External control are you gonna let them get you?
Do you wanna be a prisoner in the boundaries they set you?
You say you want to be yourself, by christ do you think they’ll let you?
They’re out to get you get you get you get you get you get you get you

Introducing the Prime Sinister, she’s a mother to us all
Like the dutch boy’s finger in the dyke her arse is in the wall
Holding back the future waiting for the seas to part
If Moses did it with is faith, she’ll do it with an army
Who at times of threatened crisis are certain to be there
Guarding national heritage no matter what or where
Palaces for kings and queens, mansions for the rich
Protection for the wealthy, defence of privilege
They’ve learnt the ropes In Ireland, engaged in civil war
Fighting for the ruling classes in their battle against the poor
So Ireland’s just an island? It’s an island of the mind
Great Britain? Future? Bollocks, you’d better look behind
Round every other corner stands P.C. 1984
Guardian of the future, he’ll implement the law
He’s there as a grim reminder that no matter what you do
Big brothers system’s always there with his beady eyes on you
From God to local bobby, in home and street and school
They’ve got your name and number while you’ve just got their rule
We’ve got to look for methods to undermine those powers
It’s time to change the tables. The future must be ours

Big A, little A, bouncing B
The system might have got you but it won’t get me

Be exactly who you want to be, do what you want to do
I am he and she is she but you’re the only you
No one else has got your eyes, can see the things you see
It’s up to you to change your life and my life’s up to me
The problems that you suffer from are problems that you make
The shit we have to climb through is the shit we choose to take
If you don’t like the life you live, change it now it’s yours
Nothing has effects if you don’t recognise the cause
If the program’s not the one you want, get up, turn off the set
It’s only you that can decide what life you’re gonna get
If you don’t like religion you can be the antichrist
If your tired of politics you can be an anarchist
But no one ever changed the church by pulling down a steeple
And you’ll never change the system by bombing number ten
Systems just aren’t made of bricks they’re mostly made of people
You may send them into hiding, but they’ll be back again
If you don’t like the rules they make, refuse to play their game
If you don’t want to be a number, don’t give them your name
If you don’t want to be caught out, refuse to hear their question
Silence is a virtue, use it for your own protection
They’ll try to make you play their game, refuse to show your face
If you don’t want to be beaten down, refuse to join their race
Be exactly who you want to be, do what you want to do
I am he and she is she but you’re they only you




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