ALONE ONE's blog – AloneOne.com


“STUCK” Zine #1

New zine out from CarnageNYC. Thick 60 pages of pics and interviews, stickers, and dope  silkscreened covers (frameable pieces themselves). Check em out…

“Stuck” No 1 consists of 60 pages of previously unreleased photos of some of the sickest NYC stickers plus interviews with BASER, ALONE, MINUS and CRASTY. Each copy of the zine comes with three hand-written stickers, along with a full set of four vinyl stickers made exclusively for this issue. The cover image was screenprinted over layers of stickers and up to four colors of paint, giving each cover a completely unique look and texture. (Note: a very small number of covers are available in white ink).

Stuck is limited to 300 hand-numbered copies.

More info and pics at CarnageNYC.

Get a copy here.

Image
Image
( * pics stolen from Juxtapoz, words snagged from Carnage.)


NYC/ Brooklyn Gang Graffiti
January 14, 2012, 12:00 pm
Filed under: Graffiti, Photography | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

After aborting my Los Angeles relocation a few years ago, I thought along with the gang driven drive-by shootings and talk of “colors”, I’d also be leaving the accompanying  graffiti. Well, maybe not so quick. Seems that New York has been getting its fair share of gang turf wars as evident on the streets of Brooklyn…





As Spotted in…

A car I painted back in ’06/’07 spotted in a photo in the Boston Globe (some story about The Big Dig) recently…

Here’s a better pic of the car…



X-MEN Boston, late 1980’s – early 1990’s
November 9, 2011, 2:41 pm
Filed under: Graffiti, Inspiration | Tags: , , , , ,

OK, first off I have to say this is barely an original post, all the pics are stolen off the internet along with the Dash history lesson, but the influence that Boston X-MEN had on my graffiti beginnings can’t be stated enough. Early to mid eighties, Boston’s elevated MBTA orange line was the center of graffiti. Looking out the windows at the cityscapes and the beautiful rooftop murals and signatures made a huge impression on me. When the el was taken down in 1989 focus turned to the streets. And from Egleston Square to Forest Hills up to Roslindale Square… it was all X-MEN…

a classic “X-MEN” blockbuster by MK. Not sure where this one was. There was one of these on a fire escape facing Egleston Sq in 89-90. It was a landmark spot. A very official “Welcome to Egleston: this is X-MEN territory!”

“SCENE” wasn’t X-MEN, but the “DASH” under SCENE’s “S” was. And this photo really brings back memories. After the orange line moved from it’s elevated Washington Street location to it’s present trench location, Amory and Lamartine streets became the new Washington Street in a way. This building was on Lamartine between Paul Gore and Wyman Streets. I would pass this on the regular going to see my first girlfriend on Sheridan St, so of course this time was quite impressionable. When this building was removed in the early 90’s for some new condos (a sign of times to come), it really was a nail in the coffin for an amazing era in Boston graffiti and my youth.


“MK” and “RICH3” at the top of the bleachers at English High School, home to many a  writer’s meatings.  Probably 1990. Well visible from Washington Street and Williams Street when cutting over to Amory Street. Great Spot.
great hand styles by WISDOM (X-MEN TUF).

“ARCH”  between Jackson Square and Roxbury Crossing, probably 1990.
.
“RICH” throw-up.

“MKAY” (MK) at Jamaica Plain High School, before it changed to English High School in 1989. Another classic location.
.
Unfortunately I can’t find the 2 MOST influential X-MEN pieces to me (Anyone has them, PLEASE send em over! (That means you BYG!)). The first was the “X-MEN” in all blues at the Forest Hills wall, 1989/1990, done by MK (and probably others, Romeo? Rich?). The second was the “ROMEO RICH” at the same wall, same time, bubble letters with a fresh yellow/green fill and (I believe) red outline and these RIDICULOUS shines. Oooh! The first time I went up to that wall in person I knew if I wanted to do graffiti, especially in Jamaica Plain, I better make that shit dope. X-MEN had seriously set some high standards.

Here’s a quick history lesson taken from BostonGraffitiGhosts.com

Continue reading


PosterBoy and Aakash Nihalani (Street Art Co-existing With Graffiti)

If street artists want to co-exist and be accepted by the graffiti world, there’s an old graffiti rule that they should understand. “DO NOT GO OVER OTHER PEOPLE.” ESPECIALLY if it’s bigger, better, or old. Sure those tags and those filled in “throw up” letters DO make a nice looking background to your street art. But that graffiti was there FIRST. It might not seem like much, but those letters were done on the spot with risk of arrest, possibly by someone from another city/country , a king, or even a RIPed writer’s last artifact. Undoubtedly potential historic pieces in the graffiti world. You CAN NOT go over them. Go BEHIND them? Hmm.. Maaaybe? ..If it’s done respectfully. This is a pic I took in Bushwick back in 2009..

Posterboy

Posterboy and Aakash Nihalani playin by the rules.

“Give respect, Get respect.”



“History Of American Graffiti” by Roger Gastman and Caleb Neelon

This book came out about a month ago. I meant to do a comprehensive review on it, but with about 400 PAGES a proper review would take months for me to write. And I don’t want to reveal too much of the book. Here’s a small preview…

First, the cover. Take off that paper one that it came with and reveal the (MUCH doper, in my opinion) vintage spraycans cover hiding under there.

Then get ready for a Graffiti History 101 on the history of over 25 cities. Just check out the Contents pages!..



Instead of starting with the expectected Cornbread and Taki 183 stories, it starts earlier with other forms of graffiti.



Of course any history book is bound to overemphasize certain people and events and omits others (REZENT! LOST!). However the Boston and New York sections are pretty accurate and no way as biased as it could have been. I’m not so knowledgeable on the other cities, but hopefully they are just as accurate.




In addition to the individual city chapters, there’s profiles on some very influential writers such as Cost, Revs, Twist, and others.


Then to top things off, they’ve even included info on spraypaint, blackbooks, tagbanging, freights, the list goes on..


I was very pleased to see the Boston chapter giving just credit to the X-men, Jayrock, Remote, and of course the much justified write up and photos of Alert (OD. KBN. 5AV) and Ryze (5AV KBN.) in the Boston chapter.


The OD crew gets their mention. I get a mention and some quote. And a photo (not one I would have chosen.. guess I should have submitted some of my own.) of an “AN” I did on the Porter MBTA tracks in 1993. Yup, the “Star Market wall”.

They also go on in the Denver section about Alert and Hel (OD KBN) relocating out there and hooking up with SWS.

Overall, this is a great book that will undoubtedly (like it or not) be used as THE first and foremost account of 20th century graffiti and will be studied for centuries to come. Grab a copy while you can still get an original first pressing.

*** Oh yeah, BIG THANKS to Caleb and Roger for hooking up me up with a copy of the book!!



SABER strikes back…
June 22, 2011, 10:48 pm
Filed under: Graffiti, Politics | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Some well spoken words from SABER MSK

THE DEVIL WEARS A PINK SUIT: A RESPONSE TO “RADICAL GRAFFITI CHIC”
.Saber, "Sacred Trash" at MOCA's "Art in the Streets" exhibitionSaber, “Sacred Trash” at MOCA’s “Art in the Streets” exhibition

After looking at the longest list of credentials of one person I’ve ever seen—Yale, University Of Cambridge, Stanford Law, Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, contributing editor of City Journal, recipient of 2005 Bradley Prize for Outstanding Intellectual Achievement, etc, etc—I came to the conclusion that approaching Heather Mac Donald’s fortified intellect would be the equivalent of challenging the IBM Chess Terminator: cold, calculating, and absent a pulse. I find it hard to believe that someone of such high stature would spend so much energy on something that seems trivial in comparison to her passion for deportation and torture. Yet she seems really upset at the idea of a museum honoring over forty years of development in Graffiti Art.

In her lengthy article “Radical Graffiti Chic,” she refers to artists as “vandal-anarchist wannabes” and attempts to highlight their hypocrisy. She names me personally in the article, stating that I am quick to sell out to any corporate sponsor: “Saber, who declares in an interview with the graffiti journal Arrested Motion that ‘there is no room for empathy when there is a motive for profit,’ has sold his designs to Levi’s, Hyundai, and Harley-Davidson.”

In trying to paint me as a hypocrite for capitalizing on my intellectual property, Heather does not take into account that I support my family through my art. I have painted everything from sets to faux finishing to gold leafing to put food on the table or to pay for health care bills, since insurance companies have refused to cover me due to a pre-existing condition (epilepsy). Heather, who is paid to write articles, should understand the process of making money for one’s creative output, and that this is not what I was referring to in the Arrested Motion quote. I was referring to health insurance companies taking away accessible facilities from sick people in order to save a buck at the expense of the patient’s life. To compare my art to the health insurance companies is ludicrous. Continue reading




%d bloggers like this: